The elevator pitch- for Business ESL

Years back when I was working in an office back home, at a meeting our boss had tasked us all with the idea of thinking out what our

Elevator pitch would be. This was a new concept to me and at the time I didn’t think it very relevant to me as I was simply working in a customer support role; most of the people I dealt with already knew what the product was (and often weren’t very happy with it, but that is another story).

Years later I have been teaching at business classes mainly for a number of years now and my mind often comes to what sort of practical speaking exercises I can use in my class. Finally the whole spirit behind the Elevator Pitch makes sense to me and is a great no prep activity you can walk into class and get your students to prepare and do without taking up too much time.

1. Setup

First the students need to know what an elevator pitch is.

I would start by loading up an image of two people talking in an elevator on my iPad and asking the students what you imagine they are talking about (of course you could print one out or find one in a magazine if you don’t have a tablet). Talk as a group or get them to brainstorm in pairs and then tell the class.

After that has run it’s course- tell them that they are,in fact,  talking about one man’s company. In fact he is giving an elevator pitch.

What is an elevator pitch you ask? Well the basic idea is- a presentation that explains what your company is and does in the time it takes to ride an elevator (my boss many years ago said “imagine that someone asks you about your company at the beginning of an elevator ride- you have until that person gets off on the 7th floor to explain in detail to them”). If that wasn’t descriptive enough- you can derive your own explanation from the wikipedia page here.

2. Help to fill out their ideas. Brainstorm.

Take a few minutes to brainstorm together what they think are the key points that you should talk about. There is really no perfect answer and it may depend on what industry they are in or what company they work for as to what is important for them to talk about. Fill out with some ideas of your own. This article may give you some ideas to add to the list or other ways you may want to coach them.

3. Plan.

Have them write out what they want to say. Set a time limit to this, the speech doesn’t need to be very long, so they shouldn’t require too long to plan. If you have a student who is struggling, focus on them to get them moving along- but for the most part circulate and tighten their grammar and provoke ideas.

4. Do.

Depending on how important speech making is for your curriculum, you may want to add a feedback session where the students say something positive about each person’s speech, write out some comments anonymously or just a Q and A session.

Oh, if you are wondering how long is an elevator ride, according to this article an average elevator ride in New York is 118 seconds.

If you have any similar class ideas I would love to hear them or read about them in your blogs! Let me know!

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